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Big addition to Bloom in today’s v940 update – a proper Photoshop format exporter with groups, layers, masks and even blending effects (think drop shadows, bevels, etc.) . All in glorious 16 bits per channel. :)

This, in general, means you can now bring PSD files into Bloom, work with them, and then export them back to the same PSD file without losing any layers. We’re still working on a few additional features, most notably preserving text objects as text and vector shapes as vector shapes – however, most of the other functionality should be there as of this version.

This update makes Bloom one of the few applications in existence, if not the only one, that we know of that can import and export full-featured PSD files with most features intact. And best of all, those who are on our maintenance subscription get this feature free of charge. :)

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Today we are happy to announce a complete rebranding of Ormr. The need for a different name became apparent as we were talking about Ormr to the press, the social media, and to new users in general. While “Ormr” is a unique name that works reasonably well in print, it is very difficult to convey in speech, being both quite tough to pronounce and to recognize.

So today, after a long and thoughtful selection process, we are renaming Ormr to Bloom. This also means that the cutesy red dragon that was associated with the name has to go, and we have a new logo to replace it. We hope that this name change will help Bloom grow faster and reach a larger number of users more quickly – which is, after all, the ultimate purpose of any application.

Please let us know if you have any thoughts, questions, or comments – as always, we would be more than happy to answer them. :)

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Today Ormr gains two big new abilities: slice export and vector brush strokes.

To activate the former, just go into View -> Show/Hide Slice View. Now select a layer, and you’ll see a neat blue outline with a settings icon on it. Click on the icon, and you can choose where and how to export this layer. Once you’re done selecting destinations, file formats, and other export options for layers and groups you’d like to export, you can click File -> Export Slices and all the layers and groups will automatically be exported to the locations you chose. Very handy for repeatable work with graphical assets.

The second feature is the one that blows our minds most. Try it: select the Brush tool, and paint a stroke or two on the canvas. Now, select that stroke in the table on the right with Brush tool still active – and you will see Bezier vector controls appear for it. You can now edit the stroke as you please, and it will follow the curve as you manipulate it. The cool thing is that you’re not editing individual brush points, since there would be too many of those – rather, you’re editing the overall outline of the curve, and all the points follow. This allows for easy brush stroke editing while still retaining all of the minute stroke details to be represented.

Want to see what’s really possible with this kind of approach? Load up a picture and swithc to the Liquify tool. Deform the image with one or two strokes, and now select one in the strokes table on the right. Yes, you can now distort the image in real time by editing each Liquify stroke directly.

Oh, and we’ve added Photoshop Custom Shapes import, too, just for kicks. :)

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Recently, we sought better ways to show you how Ormr is truly different from any other image editors out there. And, of course, what kind of a promotion would it be without a good old feature comparison? So, here you go. But before you click on the link below, let us just say that we decided to have a little bit of fun making it – after all, most basic features can be found in pretty much any application. We wanted to highlight those little quirky bits that make all the difference in user experience that may not be immediately obvious.

http://getormr.com/features/?Compare

Oh, and while looking at the comparison, remember that, unlike the other two juggernauts, Ormr is developed by a very small team (of very dedicated) people. :) Enjoy! :)

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In our latest update we’ve introduced something we call Layer History Preview that, like many other features, is unique to Ormr. As users (yes, we eat our own dog food – daily :), we already love it. Here’s why – this is your regular expanded Ormr layer with its own history:



What we’ve done here is load an image, moved it, and applied an unsharp mask to it. You will notice that if we collapse this layer (as may be convenient if we have a complex scene with many other layers and groups), and then want to change, say, how much we sharpen the image by, we will have to click on the layer to select it, then click to expand it again, and then click on an appropriate operator to show its parameters in the Parameters window.

This is all very tedious, especially if you end up doing things like this all the time. But fear not – here’s how the same layer looks in the latest version of Ormr with Layer History Preview:



Now, if you want to adjust the amount of sharpening, you can just directly click on the Unsharp Mask operator, and Ormr will both select the layer and the operator – at which point you’re free to make any adjustments you wish. All it takes is a single click. So now, you can keep most of your layers collapsed by default (you can change this in the Edit->Preferences dialog), and still be able to access their most recent history. Ormr will show as many operators as can fit between the right-edge buttons and the end of the layer’s name.

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